Tagarchief: Semezdin Mehmedinović

Bc #69: Semezdin Mehmedinović

[P]ictures of the dead and massacred turn into an ad for the war. It doesn’t matter that these people have names: TV translates them into its cool language, the naked image. The camera disembowels images of their psychological content to create information.

(Uit: Semezdin Mehmedinović, Sarajevo Blues (orig. [1996], vert. Ammiel Alcalay). San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1998, 83)

Bc #46

If a bullet hit me [the photographers]’d get a shot worth so much more than my life that I’m not even sure whom to hate: the Chetnik sniper or these monkeys with Nikons. For the Chetniks I’m just a simple target but these others only confirm my utter helplessness and even want to take advantage of it. In Sarajevo, death is a job for all of them. Life has been narrowed down completely, reduced to gestures.

(Uit: Semezdin Mehmedinović, Sarajevo Blues (orig. [1996], vert. Ammiel Alcalay). San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1998, 74)

Bc #23

I often recognize people who aren’t alive any more in war photos that I see. They were here and now they aren’t. […] As far as war photographs go, I don’t really know what purpose they serve, other than the everyday needs of newspapers and magazines.

(Uit: Semezdin Mehmedinović, Sarajevo Blues (orig. [1996], vert. Ammiel Alcalay). San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1998, 67)

Bc #6

Vojislav Maksimović, a professor of Yugoslav literature, used the decapitated head of a Muslim as a soccer ball. So I don’t have any illusions left about people or, for that matter, about nations. That’s why I don’t think a single nation exists that wouldn’t crucify Christ.

(Uit: Semezdin Mehmedinović, Sarajevo Blues (orig. [1996], vert. Ammiel Alcalay). San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1998, 23)